BLOG - February, 2010

Vancouver Olympics 2010 @ Zion

Fumika

For many of Japanese Olympics fans, today is a big day.
The women's figure skating short program.

7PM in Vancouver is 12AM in Japan, our lunch time.
We gathered in our theater room to cheer for the skaters in front of the 80-inch screen.

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Kim Yu-Na came out on top, and Mao-chan came in second after the short program.

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Can't wait to see tomorrow's free skate program!

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National Foundation Day

Fumika

February 11th is celebrated as National Foundation Day in Japan.

In the the Kojiki and the Nihonshoki, the Japanese ancient chronicles written in the eighth century, it is recorded that the first emperor of Japan was Emperor Jinmu, and he was a descendant of Amaterasu, the Goddess of the Sun. It is said that he ascended to the Imperial Throne and built his capital in the Yamato district (current Nara prefecture) on this day in the year 660 B.C.

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The present Emperor Akihito is said to be the 126th from Jinmu Emperor in the direct line.

We will be closed for tomorrow February 11th and will be back again on February 12th, Friday.

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PEANUTS

Fumika

After Mamemaki ceremony, when you clean your room few days later, you often find some beans hidden in your room, like under a fridge or behind a sofa. We usually use dried soy beans for this Bean-Throwing ceremony, but soy beans are too small and they like to hide in corners.

So, it is a smart idea to use shelled peanuts instead, and you can even have fun with those peanuts like this!

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.... Unidentified mysterious animal???

You can also use shelled peanut as a chopstick rest.

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Setsubun

Fumika

February 3rd is Setsubun in Japan.
Setsubun literally means "the day between two seasons", and according to the lunar calendar, winter ends on this day.

On Setsubun, Japanese people participate in traditional events to drive away evil spirits and bring in good fortune. One of the events is Bean-Throwing Ceremony called "Mamemaki", and people throw beans at home or temples while shouting "Fortune in and demons out." After the ceremony, people eat the same number of beans as their age to wish for good health

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Here at Trinity office, we also enjoyed this "Mamemaki"!

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Devils Out! Good Luck In!

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